The Work

Gospel Work in Japan

Praying in Town During Outreach

Praying during outreach

Japan is a difficult country for Christian mission work because the people are not very receptive to the gospel. However, God can work where He wants to work, and the Gospel must be preached in Japan also before the end can come. With about less than 1% to 2% of the population of Japan being Christian, Mount Akagi is one of the few places in Japan that is working diligently to bring hope, life, and health to the body, mind, and spirit of the people through the power of the gospel. With Japan being one of the most secular countries in the world and having quite a competitive society, the people need the rest and assurance that only God can give.

Mount Akagi has been active in several different areas of gospel service as God has given opportunity in this difficult to work country. The staff gladly receive any chance they get to show the character and love of God. Below are just a few of the events that have given them occasion for service.

John and Carlos

John

John and Sook

John and Sook

Not all of the ministry’s contacts are Japanese. In August 2011, John visited Eden Valley. While in Colorado, he enjoyed the fellowship with other guests and staff and also heard about Mount Akagi.

Having lived in Okinawa, Japan, for more than 15 years, John took an interest in the ministry. When he began regaining the weight he’d lost at Eden Valley, John’s wife, Sook, called Mount Akagi. The director, Marty Brown, explained the ministry’s approach to natural health and sent John a suggested dietary plan.

Encouraged by the outline, John started eating a vegan diet again, and he decided to visit Mount Akagi. In December 2012, Marty (Akagi president) and Mayumi Brown opened their home to the couple. By the time he and Sook arrived in December, John had lost 22 pounds. During his two-week stay at the ministry, he lost more weight and gained control of diabetes. Since then, he has stayed faithful to the plan and has not lost any more weight, but in April 2013, he had some lab work done, and everything — cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, A1C, — everything looked very good. Praise God because His ways work!
Taken from OCI

Carlos

Neff Acuna and his family arrived at Mt. Akagi in early 2013, and within a week of being there they accepted their first guest for a home lifestyle program, Carlos, the consul for the Paraguay Embassy in Tokyo. While fasting, exercising, and changing his diet helped him live without his daily injection of insulin, participating in family worship and singing with the children gave a new spiritual perspective to his life. He emphatically stated – “I’ll be back” as he left. Already, Neff has been to Tokyo to meet friends of Carlos and to help him establish a better lifestyle in his home.

Health Lectures in Town and Bible Study

Health Talk in Town

Giving a health lecture in town

A few years ago, the team at Mount Akagi began holding monthly health lectures in town. In July 2012, the location of the health lectures closed down, leaving the team searching for another location. In early 2013, a natural health related business opened their doors to the lectures the Mount Akagi team had to offer. The lectures have been going well, and in June 2013, a second location will be blessed by the lectures on God’s way of living.

Finding people interested in Bible study can be quite a difficult task in Japan. Most people know very little of Christianity, and with such busy lifestyles, many feel they don’t have the time. But God is not willing that any should perish, so He recently gave the staff a man and his daughter who want to study the Bible. Praise God for His loving kindness!

Taking in Evacuees

Fukushima Family

A family from Fukushima Prefecture

When a historic 9.0 earthquake struck Japan on Friday, March 11, 2011, few were prepared for the violent tsunami it triggered. With radiation leaking from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, many were forced to evacuate. With Mount Akagi Institute being located about 62 miles north of Tokyo and 167 southwest of Fukushima, the ministry felt the forceful tremors of the earthquake and lost electricity shortly afterward, but was far from the tsunami. The team listened to the radio reports of the ensuing loss of life, yet felt they could do little to help.

However, on March 19, the Mount Akagi team was able to lend a hand; a family of eight arrived from Fukushima Prefecture to stay with them. The family had lost their homes and belongings, and their farmland was ruined by the tsunami and radiation from the power plant.

The team offered others accommodation at the ministry, hoping to share the cleaner air and pure water source, which comes from an underground spring. Despite the heartache that was around them, they trusted that God would continue to use them to bless those who were reaching out in desperation.
Taken from OCI

LIGHT School

LIGHT 2009 Certificate Group

Teachers and students who finished LIGHT

In August 2009, Mount Akagi hosted a one-month medical missionary training LIGHT school that had in attendance 11 students, 4 translators, and 5 teachers. During the school the translators also became students because they were attending the classes and repeating everything that was taught; therefore, they also received certificates at the end. Everyone left with a renewed love for Jesus and a new sense of their life mission — to serve others as Christ did and still does.

Health Expo Nutrition

LIGHT student giving a Health Expo nutrition talk

Near the end of the LIGHT training, with the help of a few church members, a health expo was held in the largest mall in Maebashi City. The delivery of the banners ordered from Health Education Resources for the health expo was greatly delayed because the banners had never been used for a Japanese health expo, and therefore needed to be translated and formatted. The team prayed that the banners would arrive in time, and God answered — the banners arrive about three days before the event, just enough time to practice with the banners.